these are the posts tagged ‘garden’:


echeveria setosa

the setosa came to us unexpectedly (like most of our plants) when some neighbors about to move were looking for homes for their plants. we kept a few of their vases, and in one of them came this furry fellow.

we stuck it in our front garden between some rocks, and it’s been doing great ever since. as they go about reproducing and slowly dominating the patch of garden we gave them, the older leaves seem to dry out and drop, while the plants keep growing upwards.

i noticed it doesn’t need to shed leaves to propagate though: new “babies” just appear from the stem or the flower itself.

cute!

passionfruit update!

around the end of june, some of our passionfruits started turning purple. i confess we’ve been quite anxious for this last step. the vine’s many fruits been growing for over 2 months now, and with an upcoming trip fast approaching, we were running out time to actually taste the literal fruits of our labour.

so when the first mature fruit (a tiny perfect one) fell on our hands last week, we rejoiced at last. let’s open it!


(pardon the dirty fingernails, i was gardening)

look at that! :D it was just as juicy as promised, and immensely satisfying to finally taste something that was 2 years in the making. there’s plenty more on the vine, but sadly i don’t think they’ll ripen before we have to go. oh well, hopefully there will still be some left for our return — and if not, there’s always next year. i don’t think we’ll get tired of passionfruits anytime soon!

kalanchoe delagoensis

this one came to us unexpectedly, on a pot that had another plant on it. when this weird little sprout started growing in a funny shape, we put it in its own vase and low and behold, it was its own thing!

the circles at the end of each leave are baby plants that fall out of the mother when they’re ready, taking root and earning it the nickname “mother of thousands”…

if it stays true to its name, i guess we’ll soon have a baby boom around here! :D

pink echeveria

i don’t particularly like cactus, but succulents are a different story. there’s something very pleasing about their almost fractal beauty, and the thick and robust leaves. plus, i accidentally found out that we can actually grow them outdoors here (more or less easily) so i’ve started a little collection of sorts.

i’m learning about it as i go along, making mistakes and seeing what works. i don’t know if this interests anyone, but i thought i’d write about it now and then, in order to keep a record of our experiments.

first up, this echeveria “perle von nürnberg” (i think?) that i traded my parents for some cuttings of our passionfruit.

isn’t it pretty? it was almost dead when it came to me, but has since decided to grow enthusiastically in the center, and i think it might about to start flowering even!

i look forward to putting it in the garden once it gets a bit stronger, and maybe even try to propagate it at some point.

the passionfruit chronicles

i don’t think i’ve ever met a fruit i didn’t like, but passionfruit feels special. the taste is the definition of exotic in my book — sweet and alien-like.

they’re supposed to be fast-growing plants that enjoy heat, and therefore ideal for our southern climate. last year, a neighbor down the street gave us a couple of his own fruits to eat… but having seen their vigorous vines, we jumped at the opportunity to grow our own. we started them in a container back in 2016 and saw first sprouts some weeks later:

we planted them out in the front garden just under the fence, so that they had something to hold on to. after some dormant months, they begun their ascent in the spring of 2017…

fast forward to a year later, and they have taken over the whole thing. had we known they would insist in growing upwards at every chance, we would have made a better effort to pull them sideways while we could… well, too late now.

we also have our first flowers! they’re super pretty, as all passionfruit flowers are. incidentally, did you know where their name comes from? according to wikipedia,

“Around 1700, the name was given by missionaries in Brazil as an educational aid while trying to convert the indigenous inhabitants to Christianity; its name was flor das cinco chagas or “flower of the five wounds” to illustrate the crucifixion of Christ, with other plant components also named after an emblem in the Passion of Jesus.

The name maracuyá or maracujá comes from a Guaraní word meaning “nursery for flies”.

and just this week, we spotted the first fruit! i can’t wait to finally taste it and strike another item off the 101 list! :P